How We Get Free (Postponed)

We are very sad to announce that we need to postpone the How We Get Free event on December 1. Several of our speakers are no longer able to participate in the event due to circumstances out of their control. We will reschedule the event at the same venue sometime in 2019. In the meantime, we look forward to seeing you at the 5th Annual Howard Zinn Book Fair on Sunday, December 2.

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How We Get Free

A conversation on black feminism, politics, and liberation

with
Keeanga-Yamahtta Taylor
Cat Brooks
Zoé Samudzi

Also featuring poetry readings by Idrissa Simmonds

In the last several years, Black feminism has reemerged as the analytical framework for the activists response to the oppression of trans women of color, the fight for reproductive rights, and of course, the movement against police abuse and violence. The most visible organizations and activists connected to the Black Lives Matter movement speak openly about how Black feminism shapes their politics and strategies today.
—Keeanga-Yamahtta Taylor

On December 1, the night before the fifth annual Howard Zinn Book Fair, three leading activist-scholars will come together in conversation about Black Feminism past and present. The speakers, each coming from a unique radical tradition, will combine their own research and experience with the history of past movements to explore questions around race, gender, class, and ultimately, liberation. What is the role of elections? Of #BlackLivesMatter? Of Trump? How should we be organizing today for our collective liberation?

Sponsored by the Howard Zinn Book Fair and the International Socialist Organization

Featuring…

Keeanga-YamahttaTaylor_BWKeeanga-Yamahtta Taylor is an assistant Professor of African-American Studies at Princeton University. She is the author of From #BlackLivesMatter to Black Liberation, an examination of the history and politics of Black America and the development of the social movement Black Lives Matter in response to police violence in the United States. Taylor’s book, How We Get Free: Black Feminism and the Combahee River Collective explores the history of the Combahee River Collective, a trailblazing 1960s-70s group of radical black feminists through interviews with the groups founders. Her research examines race, housing, and public policy.

 

CW5A3029_BWCat Brooks was a candidate for Oakland mayor in 2018. She is a leading activist in the Black Lives Matter Movement and co-founder of the Anti-Police Terror Project whose mission is to rapidly respond to and ultimately eradicate state violence in communities of color. Brooks is also a KPFA radio host, playwright and actor.

 

 

 

Zoé Samudzi is a writer, photographer, and third year doctoral student in Medical Sociology at the University of California, San Francisco. Her doctoral research explores the Namibian genocide, German colonialism, and eugenics. She is a co-author of As Black as Resistance: Finding the Conditions for Our Liberation. Her work seeks to merge political theory, visual studies and photography, and critical approaches to science in service of a blended multidisciplinary means of articulating Blackness(es).

 

 

 

 

 

Idrissa Simmonds is a poet, essayist, fiction writer, and workshop facilitator. Winner of the 2013 Crab Creek Review Poetry Prize, Idrissa has been a finalist for the Commonwealth Short Story Award and a New York Foundation for the Arts Grant in poetry. Her work has most recently appeared in Black Renaissance Noire, James Franco Review, Fourteen Hills Press, and Room Magazine. She has been the recipient of fellowships and residencies from Hedgebrook, Bread Loaf Writers Conference, Poets House, and VONA/Voices. She is co-editor of BreakBeat Poets Vol. 2: Black Girl Magic. She curates Brunch & Word, a bi-coastal literary salon.